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Hawaii Foodbank Welcomes Amy Marvin

New President and CEO to Begin May 1

Following a nationwide search, we are excited to announce Amy Marvin as Hawaii Foodbank’s new president and CEO effective May 1. She brings to the position more than two decades of experience specializing in operations, financial management and fund development.

Marvin most recently served as senior vice president and chief operating officer of Bishop Museum, where she was responsible for the day-to-day management and finances of the public museum. While there, she led the Museum in the development and implementation of a successful three-year strategic business plan, increased stakeholder engagement and impact, and stabilized the Museum’s financial operations, which moved from annual operating losses to net surpluses during her tenure.

“I am extremely proud of what I achieved at Bishop Museum and look forward to bringing my experience and skill set to Hawaii Foodbank to help end hunger in Hawaii,” said Marvin. “Consistent access to quality, nutritious food is a fundamental human right. I am deeply committed to being a part of the solution and helping make a meaningful, positive impact in the lives of people in Hawaii.”

Hawaii Foodbank President and CEO Amy Miller Marvin

"Hawaii Foodbank is playing a significant role in creating positive change toward a healthier and more resilient Hawaii, and I am truly honored and grateful for the opportunity to be a part of this incredibly important organization.”

Amy Marvin, new president and CEO of Hawaii Foobank

Hawaii Foodbank Board Chair David Herndon said, “Amy is a natural fit for the position. Her extensive leadership experience in nonprofit operations, financial management, fundraising, strategic planning and organizational development, as well as her thorough understanding of Hawaii and its unique challenges, will serve the organization well.”

Prior to joining Bishop Museum in 2016, Marvin served as the vice president for institutional advancement at the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia, where she helped foster an innovative partnership between the Academy and Drexel University. Before that, she was the vice president of institutional advancement at Bishop Museum, where she spearheaded the Museum’s Hawaiian Hall restoration campaign. She also worked as the development and volunteer program coordinator at The Dolphin Institute & Kewalo Basin Marine Mammal Lab.

Marvin graduated magna cum laude from Harvard University with a bachelor’s degree in environmental science and public policy. She also earned her master’s degree in psychology from the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. She is a 2018-2019 Omidyar Fellow.

Added Marvin, “While the toll of COVID-19 on our community has been devastating, the work of Hawaii Foodbank and its network of donors and partner organizations during this critical time has been nothing short of inspirational. Hawaii Foodbank is playing a significant role in creating positive change toward a healthier and more resilient Hawaii, and I am truly honored and grateful for the opportunity to be a part of this incredibly important organization.”

Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, hunger in Hawaii has increased by nearly 60 percent. Hawaii Foodbank has responded by distributing more than 27 million pounds of food.

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